Studio

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My weaving practice encompasses the design and creation of both functional and artistic textiles.

When possible, I choose locally sourced fibres and use only natural materials in both my production weaving and my art practice.

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To complement my hand-weaving practice, I integrate techniques such as hand-spinning, dyeing and embroidery.

Weaving is the process by which two sets of threads are interlaced at right angles to form a continuous web, or cloth. The warp threads are the lengthwise yarns, which are set up first on the loom. The weft yarns are the crosswise intersecting yarns. The loom consists of a framework to hold the warp yarns rigid while the weft is interlaced. Depending on how the warp is threaded onto the loom and the order the treadles are pressed to raise warp yarns, a multitude of patterns / structures can be woven to create textiles.

On the loom: Riverbank scarf. Warp: cotton, merino wool and ikat-dyed silk. Weft: cotton. Once off the loom, merino wool yarns will be felted along one selvege.

On the loom: Riverbank scarf. Warp: cotton, merino wool and ikat-dyed silk. Weft: cotton. Once off the loom, merino wool yarns will be felted along one selvege.

Raw silk warp threads, ikat-dyed, drying on the warping mill. To be woven into Swedish Lace scarves.

Raw silk warp threads, ikat-dyed, drying on the warping mill. To be woven into Swedish Lace scarves.

Since 2007, I have designed and woven functional textiles as Marshall Arts Fine Handwoven Textiles. I am always looking for ways to integrate thoughtful design with the production weaving process.  The interplay of structure, bold stripes, and analagous colours allow me the opportunity to compose with pattern, texture and colour.

On the loom: cotton cloth for pouches in Gothic Cross pattern.

On the loom: cotton cloth for pouches in Gothic Cross pattern.

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My textile art employs a technique called inlay that I have adapted to build woven imagery through over-shot patterning. Using small tapestry bobbins of hand-spun wool weft that I hand manipulate through a loom-controlled warp, I am able to weave blocks of colour that compose the terrain of a geographical area. These wall-hangings are made by following the path of the weft: line by line I am controlling the shape of many areas of colour.

Once the weaving process is completed, the piece is removed from the loom and hand washed. Using fine coloured cotton yarn, I then embroider details such as roads, shorelines, routes, etc. to highlight significant stories within the landscape.